Holy Liturgy, Holy Living: Lessons from the Book of Leviticus

Holy Liturgy, Holy Living: Lessons from the Book of Leviticus
From Adoremus.org: “Peter Maurin, co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement with Dorothy Day in 1933, stands before a Worker house in New York City. . .”

In his commentary on the Book of Psalms, Robert Davidson asserts, “If worship does not lead us to ask searching questions about ourselves, then it is little more than a harmless hobby.” Indeed, a number of psalms dare to ask some of those probing questions, like: “Lord, who may sojourn in your tent, who may dwell on your holy hill?” (15:1); or “Who shall ascend the hill of the Lord? And who shall stand in his holy place?” (24:3). And the answers invariably given to such questions echo the Book of Leviticus, arguably the Bible’s richest goldmine on holy liturgy and holy living, and on the relationship between the two. In this guest article for the Adoremus Bulletin, I attempt to explore some of those riches by focusing on what Leviticus says about the object, the objective, the offerings, and the offerers of our liturgy. Spoiler alert: Conviction ahead . . . and a chance to rethink why we go to church.

Read Holy Liturgy, Holy Living: Lessons from the Book of Leviticus here on Adoremus.org.